The gift of writing historical fiction by Liz Hyder – Historia Magazine

All of my research, whatever it is, feeds into the world of the book, often in ways barely perceptible to the reader, a detail, a brushstroke to add colour. But I love all of it, that sense of feeling like a detective, tracking down the elements that will help you crack the story.

Writing historical fiction, or ‘historical-adjacent fiction’ as a friend calls what I write (given the growing of wings!), is such a fascinating, brilliant, inspiring joy of a thing, embarking on a journey of exploration into the past, following my own lifelong love of history, to bring you, the reader, on a storytelling journey alongside me.

The gift of writing historical fiction by Liz Hyder – Historia Magazine

Is your story idea viable? 7 tips to help you decide – The History Quill

Inspiration for a novel can come from anywhere, and it’s always exciting when an idea strikes. But how do you know if an idea is viable? What does viable even mean?

Essentially, an idea is viable if it’s strong enough to carry a whole novel, from the first page to the last.

But how do we know if the spark of inspiration is strong enough? How can we be sure there is sufficient ‘fire’ in the initial idea to fuel an entire novel, so your story doesn’t fizzle out 40,000 words into a draft? The following 7 tips will help you decide.

Is your story idea viable? 7 tips to help you decide – The History Quill

How Amazon Turned Everyone Into a Romance Writer (and Created an Antitrust Headache) | Observer

To me, the move by big publishers, driven by the corporate bottom line, to invest in maximizing their return on a small affluent readership has abandoned the much broader readership that mass market once served—bringing people into the reading fold from their train stations and drugstores and grocery lines—leaving those readers to a free-for-all where they only haphazardly get the benefit of professional attention to what they read and deliberate distribution. One keeps hearing that the price of physical books is likely to go up, furthering the divide between those who are exposed to vetted reading and those who are not. Self-publishing creates wonderful opportunities, but it leaves a lot of work to the audience. The forces at work in romance publishing are, like the stories themselves, a heightened version of the rest of life, not only in book publishing but in journalism and education and the arts: market forces understood as “inevitable” are leeching the benefits of the work of culture more and more out of the world in which most people live.

How Amazon Turned Everyone Into a Romance Writer (and Created an Antitrust Headache) | Observer

Derided for Centuries, Romance Novels Are a Huge Business | Observer

Romance readers are avid readers and read across genres; 50 percent of them will try a new author—a much higher percentage than readers of other genres. Largely because of the might of romance, women have been the driving audience for mass market publishing. Until recently, these widely distributed books have, observers say, remained impulse buys and have attracted customers to retailers who go on to buy other merchandise (exactly Amazon’s strategy). In a 2017 report on the state of mass-market publishing, Publishers Weekly noted that mass-market paperbacks are still favored by readers and “considered the ‘gateway’ format”: “mass-market titles are the books that turn some people on to reading, period.”

Derided for Centuries, Romance Novels Are a Huge Business | Observer