Winter Promotion

sale with red shopping bags, vector background

Hi, everyone. As you know, I occasionally do sales and promotions of my eBooks. Through January 1, 2021, my eBooks are either free or heavily discounted on Smashwords. Sales links and prices:

Seen Through the Phantom’s Eyes Series

In The Eye of The Beholder – 99 cents; Through the Opera Glass – Free; In The Eye of The Storm – 99 cents; Seen Through the Phantom’s Eyes Omnibus – $2.99

Pocketful of Stories Series – All Free

Last Stop: Storyville; Yellowjack and the Riverman; A Light Across the Lake; Down on the Corner of Love; Two Days in June; Flowers of Europe; It Happened in Memphis; Hard-Boiled Blues

Full Length Fiction

Bayou Fire – 99 cents

Short Fiction

Around the World in 80 Pages – Free; The Rock Star in the Mirror (Or, How David Bowie Ruined My Life) – Free; His Beloved Infidel – Free; Brief Interludes – Free; Clytie’s Caller – Free

Non-fiction and Essays

Les Pensées Dangereuses – Free; Sui Generis – Free; 2010 Hindsight: A Year of Personal Growth In Spite of Myself – Free; Some Brief Advice for Indie Authors – Free; Hugs and Hisses (benefits Humane Society Silicon Valley) – $1.99; Music, Mayhem, and Bad Decisions – $1.49

If you enjoy my work; I would appreciate reviews wherever you prefer to leave them. Thank you!

Sample Saturday: “In The Eye of The Storm”

eye2Hello, everyone. This week’s snippet comes from my award-winning second novel, In The Eye of The Storm. In this scene, Claire and Veronique (the narrator) are living on the Presidio of San Francisco in the aftermath of the 1906 earthquake.  Claire takes a stand against bigotry while helping serve earthquake stew to her fellow refugees.


The earthquake was a great social leveler. Nabobs and poor folk alike stood in long queues for food and coffee. On a particular afternoon, Maman and I were helping to serve food when some of the society ladies took it upon themselves to try to tell her how to behave.

They whispered about Maman as she ladled another spoonful of pale stew onto a plate and handed it to the next person in line.

“She’s French. She may not know any better. We need to tell her.”

Another scoop of stew, another quiet “thank you” from the recipient.

“Mrs. Rochambeau.”

I don’t remember the name of the society woman who addressed her.

“Yes?”

“Might I have a moment of your time?”

Maman wiped her hands on her apron. “Sergeant Pickett, would you be so kind as to carry on without me for just a moment?”

“Yes’m. I’ll do that.” His dark eyes watched her go, concern written all over his face, even has he spooned more food onto plates.

She joined the cluster of stern-faced women.

“Mrs. Rochambeau, you are serving in the wrong line. That’s the line for … “ The pause seemed to go on forever. “Colored people. That’s why Pickett is serving them. It’s not right for us to be serving people like them.”

The women nodded in unison, heads bobbing like so many chickens looking for scratch.

“Oh,” Maman responded drily. “I am so glad you told me. You see, me being French and all, I must be awfully ignorant. Tell me, ladies, who else am I to avoid serving? The Irish, like my friend Maeve Kaye? The African men, like Sergeant Pickett? The Chinese ladies, like my daughter’s friend and amah, Ming? French people like myself? Perhaps the Italians, like Signore Caruso? Please, do enlighten me.”

The first woman spoke again. “Please, don’t be insolent. We’re trying to help you. Colored people serve us, not the other way around. You’ll give them ideas. The Bible says that the races are not to mix.”

“The only idea I intend to give anyone, Mesdames, is that I can hand food to hungry people; which is something that the Bible commands us to do. I do not recall seeing anything in that book that says we are only to provide food to those who look the same as we do. I volunteered to help Monsieur le Docteur Torney in any way I can, and today he has asked me to serve this stew. What are you ladies, with all of your ‘thou shalt nots,’ doing to help?”

Without waiting for a reply, Maman turned on her heel and walked back to Sergeant Pickett with her nose in the air.

“Miz Rochambeau, you don’t want to make those ladies mad. They’re officers’ wives.”

“I don’t care if they’re the Queens of the May Festival,” she replied. She looked Pickett directly in the eye; neither her gaze nor that of the buffalo soldier wavered. “I am here to help all who come, Sergeant Pickett. All. “


Want your own copy of In The Eye of The Storm? Here are the back cover copy and purchase links.

San Francisco, 1948

When a mysterious stranger approaches Clarice Kaye in her favorite restaurant, his words trigger a voyage of discovery: “You look just like your grandmother, but you have your mother’s eyes.”

There was only one question in Clarice’s mind: how could he know?

Armed with family diaries that tell of the scandalous grandmother for whom she was named, Clarice embarks on a journey through Paris’ modern art movement, 1906 San Francisco, and the depths of the Opéra Garnier in this long-awaited sequel to In The Eye of The Beholder.

In The Eye of The Storm is the 2015 Silver Medal Winner for Best Fan Fiction in the Global eBook Awards.

Alibris

Amazon (Click through on this link and it will automatically take you to the site for your country)

Apple Books

Barnes & Noble

Blackwells (Great Britain)

Bokus (Sweden)

Book Depository

Bookshop

Booktopia (Australia)

Chapters Indigo (Canada)

Dymocks (Australia)

FNAC (France)

IndieBound

Kobo

Mondadori (Italy)

Rakuten Overdrive (via your local library)

Riffle

Scribd

Smashwords

Sample Saturday: “In The Eye of The Storm”

eye2Hi, everyone. Today’s sample is from my award-winning novel, In The Eye of The Storm. The narrator here is Veronique, the teenaged daughter of Claire Delacroix LeMaître and her late husband, Erik. Enjoy!

—–

I believe that the most beautiful man I have ever seen was Amedeo Modigliani. He came to Paris just a month or two before we left, and I remember seeing him at table when Max Jacob brought him to sup with us. His dark curls and deep brown eyes, his beautiful face; I was smitten. I didn’t care that he was Jewish, Italian — or that he was in love with an English woman named Beatrice (while living with a dreadful French woman called Jehanne). I was determined to marry him. Even though I was not yet fifteen years old, I was sure that he would wait for me to be of age. His skin was as fair as Maman’s, who said that Monsieur Modigliani looked unwell. She invited him to dine with us often so that he might have a decent meal.

Maman worried about Beau-Père’s friends at Lapin Agile and Bateau Lavoire, as they called their ateliers. She said they lived in horrible conditions, but I didn’t know what she meant because she would not let me see. She also said that Beau-Père and Monsieur Matisse were the only ones of our circle who go to a real home at night. I told her that one day I would marry Amedeo and that we would have a real home. She smiled sadly at me; she did not understand that to be Madame Modigliani was my life’s fondest dream.

I look back on those innocent thoughts with sadness because Maman was right. My beloved Amedeo was unwell; he had tuberculosis.


Want your own copy of In The Eye of The Storm? Here are the back cover copy and purchase links.

San Francisco, 1948

When a mysterious stranger approaches Clarice Kaye in her favorite restaurant, his words trigger a voyage of discovery: “You look just like your grandmother, but you have your mother’s eyes.”

There was only one question in Clarice’s mind: how could he know?

Armed with family diaries that tell of the scandalous grandmother for whom she was named, Clarice embarks on a journey through Paris’ modern art movement, 1906 San Francisco, and the depths of the Opéra Garnier in this long-awaited sequel to In The Eye of The Beholder.

In The Eye of The Storm is the 2015 Silver Medal Winner for Best Fan Fiction in the Global eBook Awards.

Alibris

Amazon (Click through on this link and it will automatically take you to the site for your country)

Apple Books

Barnes & Noble

Blackwells (Great Britain)

Bokus (Sweden)

Book Depository

Bookshop

Booktopia (Australia)

Chapters Indigo (Canada)

Dymocks (Australia)

FNAC (France)

IndieBound

Kobo

Mondadori (Italy)

Rakuten Overdrive (via your local library)

Riffle

Scribd

Smashwords

“Authors Give Back” Metrics

Hi, everyone. The Authors Give Back promotion I did via Smashwords ended at midnight last night. From the mid-March to May 31, I did some form of giveaway. Honestly, it was the least I could do during this difficult time.

Because the promotion was so long, doing a complete breakdown would be boring. I mean, let’s be real. Instead, here are the top 5, in order of sales ranking.

  1. Clytie’s Caller. My sweet Regency romance novella remains popular with readers.
  2. Seen Through the Phantom’s Eyes: The Omnibus Edition. Three books in one; the Phantom of the Opera fans have consistently given this book five stars. Two of the books in the omnibus have won awards, and this makes me happy.
  3. It Happened in Memphis. This is one of my Pocketful of Stories series, dealing with the earliest days of rock and roll. I had originally planned for it to be a full-length project of its own and did a ton of research, but the story had different plans.
  4. In The Eye of The Storm. My second Phantom novel, featuring one of my favorite characters ever: Clarice. It’s also garnered two awards, one of them for James Courtney’s eye-catching cover art.
  5. A two-way tie between Bayou Fire (recipient of four awards) and Around the World in 80 Pages. The first features my favorite hero to date, and the latter is a collection of short fiction.

If you selected one of my books via Smashwords during the promotion, I would be honored if you were to write a review at your favorite site or on your blog. Thank you!