Southern Pride in a Time of Terror

These words are beautifully spoken. I vividly remember my first visit to the deep South. I was in Atlanta for a conference. I was shocked at how many Confederate monuments there were, and it made me — a white woman — feel very uncomfortable. I could only imagine how those monuments made people of color feel every day. Because those monuments were a deliberate reminder to people of color that they had best not step out of line.

I can love New Orleans with all my heart (and I do) and still be glad that the Liberty Place monument (and many others) are now going into museums instead of standing on public streets.

hecatedemeter

1452646306981

I’m a child of the American South.  I’m the Witch of this Southern place, this place here in Virginia, close-by the shores of Spout Run and the Potomac River.  I’m a woman whose spiritual life consists mainly of being in relationship with my Southern landbase.  And there’s a lot about the South that makes me proud.

I’m proud of our cooking, a melange, as Michael Twitty notes, of African, European, Island, and Native traditions.  Chef Twitty has called our cuisine a family affair and sometimes one full of family fights.  Give me ham biscuits, a mint julep, Old Bay, crawfish étouffée, fried catfish, my Aunt May’s hushpuppies, and a chess pie.

I’m proud of Southern writing, a genre not afraid to explore the shadows and the weird and to claim them, to claim them fully.

I’m proud of Southern gardens, Southern architecture, and Southern music.  Jazz, ya’ll.  Bluegrass.  Rock and…

View original post 1,198 more words

Available Now on Smashwords!

Interested in writing horror? Here’s a source that can help.

Hopes and Dreams: My Writing and My Sons

by Lillian Csernica on August 15, 2017

51kdhg-ttgl

Horror can be anything from the most elegant ghost story to the total freak-out of a bloodthirsty serial killer. The Fright Factory can show you how to make the most of your story ideas. Choose the best setting. Build a better monster. Learn the fine art of creating suspense! It’s all here, including an essential list of the worst horror cliches no editor wants to see.

depositphotos_10741587-stock-illustration-evil-red-eye

Want to find out if I really do know what I’m talking about? Fallen Idol appeared in DAW’s The Year’s Best Horror Stories XX. Just 99 cents from Digital Fiction Publishing!

511zzaapral

blood-splatter-clipart-16

View original post

The #1 Question All Writers Should Ask

Excellent point here!

Hopes and Dreams: My Writing and My Sons

by Lillian Csernica on August 11, 2017

75225985-danger-of-avalanches

Stories grow out of two questions: What if? and What next?

If you’re like me, your stories tend to start out as a sudden flash of action or dialogue. Maybe you think of a character first, and then the problem. Either way, once you’ve got your basic idea on paper and it’s time to think about story structure, there’s one essential question you must answer:

Why now?

23450387736_a83f7d1aa5

In Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, Ebenezer Scrooge has to change his ways right now or he won’t live to see another Christmas.

url5 galaxy6manual.info

In The Hunger Games, when Katniss’ little sister is chosen to represent their District, Katniss has to take action right now to save her sister’s life. The only acceptable way is to volunteer and take her place.

967ea53a17056bc2172891ec523ef227-the-martian-book-covers

In Andy Weir’s novel The Martian, astronaut Mark Watney has to come up…

View original post 67 more words

On Calling Ourselves Writers

Nice piece here. My two cents: if you write, you are a writer.

Go Dog Go Café

gypsy-rose-lee-1941-women-at-typewriter

Davy D is off this week because of work and family commitments.  I look forward to his thoughtful weekly posts as they both stimulate my thinking as well as my creativity.  I know that many of you look forward to these posts as well and I thought I would try to fill Davy’s formidable shoes this week.

An important part of my journey over the last year has been the transformation in my own thinking about myself as a middle-aged woman who happens to write a little to thinking of myself as a writer and a poet.  We have talked a bit already here about whether we can claim the title “poet” or whether it is a title that needs to be bestowed.  I want to dig a little deeper this week into what it means to understand “writer” and/or “poet” to be part of our core identity.  A truth…

View original post 276 more words

Who Writes Your Stories?

I am definitely character-driven; sometimes they have ideas that are better than mine. 😉 In fact, that happened again just this morning. Great article here.

A Writer's Path

by Mae McKinnon

As much as it sounds like one, no, that isn’t a trick question. And we’re not talking about ghost-writers either.

There are many voices involved when writing. Some of these we’re aware of, others are more ambiguous. We all bring with us, after all, however subconsciously, our prior experiences (whether we remember them or not).

As such, there are many ways a story can come together, but most of them can be boiled down to being either a) author driven or b) character driven.

View original post 563 more words