Pompeii Still Has Buried Secrets | The New Yorker

I got off at the stop called Pompeii Scavi—“the ruins of Pompeii”—and headed toward the modern gates that surround the ancient city. Before Pompeii was drowned in ash, it had a circumference of about two miles, enclosing an area of some hundred and seventy acres—a fifth the size of Central Park. Its population is estimated to have been about eleven thousand, roughly the same number as live in Battery Park City. After the ruins were rediscovered, in the mid-eighteenth century, formal excavations continued throughout the nineteenth century and into the twentieth, with successive directors of the site exposing mansions, temples, baths, and, eventually, entire streets paved with volcanic rock. About a third of the ancient city has yet to be excavated, however; the consensus among scholars is that this remainder should be left for future archeologists, and their presumably more sophisticated technologies.

Pompeii Still Has Buried Secrets | The New Yorker

I always enjoy an opportunity to share a bit of my research process with readers. This article on Pompeii came out just a few days ago. The train station to which the author makes reference was half a block from my hotel in Pompei.

The article provides an excellent overview of the most current research into Pompeii’s ruins and what the future holds for site.

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