Blast From the Past: My Interview with Tracy Portis Holmes, Part II

Hi, everyone.  As promised, here is part two of my interview with the late Tracy Portis Holmes.  A text-only version appeared in my GoodReads blog on July 22, 2010.


ITEOTB Wrap Cover frtWhat does Erik mean to you as a person, not as an author or do the two overlap?

Erik is the personification of Jung’s wounded healer archetype. He is in need of aid and compassion so that he may render aid and compassion to others.

Did you keep with the idea that Erik’s mother never kissed him or did you write a different mother? You do not have to go into details or spoilers. Just say yes or no if you do not want to elaborate. Or this may not apply in your novel. If not in your novel then what in your thoughts?

Eye Of The Storm Cover_revisedIt didn’t really apply in my novel, and very little of it is addressed in Leroux. I think that craniofacial abnormalities were poorly understood and that Leroux uses Erik’s deformities as a stepping-off place for social commentary about the shallowness of Parisian society.

Did you ever consider bringing Erik into the future in the times we live in now?

Nope.

Do you think Erik would have been a very possessive husband?

Absolutely.

opera-glass-cover-2Did you ever consider that Erik might have been sexually abused as well as physically by his captors at the fair?

It was not part of my consideration.

Have you ever wondered why Erik could not have fallen in love with a homely woman instead of wanting the beautiful Christine?

IMO, Erik’s feelings for Christine are obsession and covetousness, not love.

How many years in age apart are Erik and your heroine?

About 12.

What is you personal opinion of Raoul?

omnibusfrontcoverThe personification of the ideal husband during the era. He was much whinier in Leroux than Andrew Lloyd Weber made him; in Leroux there were times when I wanted to reach into the pages, slap him and yell “Pull yourself together!”

Most Phantom authors I notice do not allow themselves to read other Phantom authors books so that their stories will be theirs and theirs alone.How much discipline does that take?

A lot. Some of the ideas sound very interesting. Like Sadie Montgomery, I read a couple before I got my own idea — but that was the point at which I stopped. I don’t want to accidentally plagiarize.

Besides other Phantom authors who are some of your favorite authors?

Oscar Wilde, Anya Seton, Kathy Reichs, Sharyn McCrumb, William Shakespeare, Jane Austen, Marguerite Henry, Walter Farley, Jaimey Grant, Edward C. Patterson … and a host of others. My taste is pretty eclectic.

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